Alzheimers; The Causes And Symptoms Of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is mainly a brain disorder that involves the deterioration of mental functions. This illness mainly results from the gradual shrinking of brain tissues. This type of brain disorder is also known as dementia or diffuse -brain- atrophy.

· The Causes and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease

The actual cause of the disease is still unknown but several factors are believed to be responsible in the development of the brain disorder. The lack of neurochemical factors in the nerve cells is also one of the probable causes of this disease.

The genetics and aging problems are considered to be the main causes of Alzheimer’s disease. There are approximately nine out of ten thousand people affected with this malady and it is more often in women than in men. The disease primarily occurs in older people over the age of 65. However, there is very little chance for developing Alzheimer’s disease through inherited mutated genes.

The most common symptoms of the Alzheimer’s are as follows:

Impaired memory and thinking: The person feels difficulty in remembering very common things like his personal information, such as his place of birth or his occupation.

Difficulty in performing familiar tasks: The person with Alzheimer’s disease feels to have difficulty in performing his daily tasks i.e. eating, dressing, showering etc. A person who prepares a meal may forget to serve it or even can’t remember whether he has prepared it.

Problems with communication: The person gradually feels difficulty in recalling words or understanding the meanings of common words.

Disorientation and confusion: Patients may get lost in his own familiar place. Recognizing familiar places and situations becomes impossible for them. They even can’t understand simple commands or follow directions.

Poor and decreased judgment: The person feels difficulty in taking decisions. As the people affected are always in their own state of mind so they may also leave the house on a cold day without any winter garment or they may even go to the market wearing pajamas.

Misplacing and messing up with things: The person affected with A.D. usually forgets where he has kept his daily used things, such as glasses, keys, etc. The person may also mess up with things, such as breaking glasses, damaging house hold goods, etc.

Changes in behavior and personality: Patients have the tendency to swing their moods rapidly. The patients may even feel dramatic changes in their personality and can become fearful, angry, quiet, etc.

Become passive and lose interest: People generally tend to become passive and show no interest in their usual activities. Extra encouragement is required to make them become active.

Problems with abstract thinking: The person with Alzheimer’s disease loves to spend lots of time alone in some lonely place and shows less interest in interacting with other members of the family. They sometimes show symptoms of abstract thinking and also even feel difficulty in recognizing numbers or understanding what to do with them.

Forget the cure for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer, or diabetes. Unless

If you want a cure for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer, or diabetes, don’t count on the academia, the National Institute of Health (NIH), or the biotech/pharmaceutical industry. With all the money they have spent on researching these diseases, they have very little to show for it.

In 1971, during the State of the Union address, President Nixon declared the war on cancer proposing “an intensive campaign to find a cure for cancer.” Since 1971, Americans spent, through taxes, donations, and private R&D, about $200 billion in inflation-adjusted dollars. This money produced 1.56 million papers on cancer. Yet, today we are no closer to a cure than we were in 1971. Why?

Consider what Dr. Almog said in his paper: Drug Industry in “depression” (Almog, D. Drug industry in “depression”. Med Sci Monit. 2005 Jan;11(1):SR1-4, I would urge you to read his paper, it’s an eye opener on relationship between academic research and commercial drug discovery): “When the basic science/biology of disease is not available, no new drugs come to market.” With the billion of dollars spent by the NIH on basic science, and the millions of papers published on the topic, the question is, “Why isn’t the basic science/biology of disease available? Individual discoveries in the biology of human disease are cornerstone in new treatments. However, in drug discovery, these basic science/biology discoveries are seemingly unrelated dots. To connect the dots you need a theory. The Blind Men and the Elephant is a famous story about six blind men encountering an elephant for the first time. Each man, seizing on the single feature of the animal, which he appeared to have touched first, and being incapable of seeing it whole, loudly maintained his limited opinion on the nature of the beast. The elephant was considered a wall, a spear, a snake, a tree, a fan or a rope, depending on whether the blind men had first grasped the creature’s side, tusk, trunk, knee, ear or tail. The story epitomizes the problem of the reductionist approach in biology. A recent book Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease, by Hanan Polansky [11], presents an alternative. The book identifies the disruption that causes atherosclerosis, cancer, obesity, osteoarthritis, type II diabetes, alopecia, type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, asthma, lupus, thyroiditis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, graft versus host disease, and other chronic diseases, and describes the sequence of events that leads from the disruption to the molecular, cellular, and clinical effects.

What are the implications of the NIH failure? A decline in the number of new drugs introduced by pharmaceutical companies. Consider what professor Taylor says in his paper: Fewer new drugs from the pharmaceutical industry (Taylor D. Fewer new drugs from the pharmaceutical industry. BMJ. 2003 Feb 22;326(7386):408-9): “In 2002 spending on medicines exceeded $400bn (£248bn; 377bn) worldwide. Optimists in the pharmaceutical industry believe that the global market for their products will go on expanding by around 10% a year, with the United States continuing to lead towards higher per capita outlays. Expenditure on research by the pharmaceutical industry is also increasing worldwide. It is now over $45bn a year—twice the sum recorded at the start of the 1990s—and projected to rise to $55bn by 2005-6. Concerns are growing, however, about the productivity of research being funded by the major pharmaceutical companies. … Empirical evidence indicates a crisis in productivity in pharmaceutical research. The number of medicines introduced worldwide that contain new active ingredients dropped from an average of over 60 a year in the late 1980s to 52 in 1991 and only 31 in 2001. The overall number of new active substances undergoing regulatory review is still falling.”

On the one hand, the expenditure on research is increasing. On the other, the number of new drugs is decreasing. The professionals call this situation the productivity crisis in drug discovery.

The NIH failed to produce the so much needed biology of chronic disease because it is caught in the reductionist mentality. Dr. Hanan Polansky offers an alternative. If we want a cure for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer, or diabetes, we need to seriously consider his alternative.

Is There A Cure For Alzheimer’s?

There are scientific advancements that look promising for preventing and even reversing the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive deterioration of the brain, first described in 1907 by the German neurologist Alois Alzheimer (1864–1915). It is the most common form of dementing, or mind-depriving, illness, affecting cells in an area of the brain important to memory.

Alzheimer’s disease or Alzheimer’s syndrome most commonly strikes elderly adults, but it has also been known to afflict people in their late twenties.

People with Alzheimer’s experience difficulties communicating, learning, thinking and reasoning – problems severe enough to have an impact on an individual’s work, social activities and family life.

Alzheimer’s is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the number of people affected. It is emerging to potentially become the largest medical problem facing the elderly in the 21st century.

Currently there are as many as 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s and that number is expected to grow to as many as 16 million by 2050.

A new person is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s every 71 seconds, and because people are living longer Alzheimer’s disease has become a serious health problem that governments must face; this disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in America alone. Alzheimer’s disease is becoming tragically common.

Over 12 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. The direct and indirect cost of caring for Alzheimer’s victims in the United States alone is more than $100 billion a year.

With these startling statistics, can anything be done to save our brains from this horrific deterioration? Will more seniors be able to avoid falling victim to Alzheimer’s as the elderly population increases? Are we finally getting close to a cure?

The conventional medical approach is limited to pain relief and controlling some of the related symptoms by using expensive prescription drugs riddled with side effects.

But in reality, extensive research reveals that proliferation of Alzheimer’s disease in society is a direct manifestation of our changed lifestyles. When people around the world experience similar problems, it’s not a random incident but a methodical process spreading across cultures and borders.

You see, our lifestyle choices have gotten us into this mess. We need to make the right choices to get us out.

The fact is the exponential increase in Alzheimer’s disease is really the result of the way our lives have changed. The bad news is we are used to living a certain way now and it isn’t easy to change. The good news is that change is in our power and with it better health.

One way to help lower the risk of dementia and one that you can have responsibility for is to change your habits of life, eat healthily and take regular exercise. Currently, researchers studying Alzheimer’s patients have noticed that those who stay healthy and take specific nutritional supplements have slowed down and even reversed the decline.

Yes, Alzheimer’s is NOT an incurable condition. Alzheimer’s is curable and CAN be reversed.

Everyday now more and more people are finding that they can start to reverse their Alzheimer’s.