Diabetes: Cause And Prevention

An individual may get diabetes when the pancreas can no longer secrete the needed hormones that produce insulin. The insulin maintains the glucose in the blood to be normal. Low insulin means that the level of glucose, which is sugar in the blood, may get high and may lead to diabetes.

The autoimmune reaction is a type 1 diabetes where the cells in the pancreas organ that produces the needed insulin are destroyed. This results to the total loss of insulin in the hormones. This happens because the body has its own hormones that protects and destroys its own pancreas cells.

Although there is no scientific proof why this occurrence in the pancreas happens, some studies have some theories that may possibly be related in this kind of reaction. Some say that this happens when there is exposure of a newly born to a cow’s milk, the infection from viruses and bacteria, and the exposure from food-borne chemical toxins. There is not enough evidence yet to prove some theories that may trigger the cause of diabetes.

The type 2 diabetes is said to progress when there is lack of insulin that is needed to maintain the blood sugar in the body. Another reason is believed to be that the needed insulin not be effective effective to control the blood sugar because of abnormalities in composition. The last reason is said to be that the receptors in cells no longer respond and fail to stimulate the organ that produces the needed insulin.

An individual is likely developing the type 2 diabetes when a person is overweight or obese. The increase of age of an individual is also considered a factor in acquiring this type of diabetes. Some few cases that may lead in this type of diabetes may include when a woman is having her pregnancy, or when a person have some intakes of medicines and drugs. In addition, any sickness or infectious decease that can alter the pancreas production of insulin.

There are some basic treatments for diabetes. These ways can serve an individual its important role in treating diabetes. Here are some ways on how a person can treat diabetes problems.

1. An individual must work thoroughly in obtaining his ideal body weight. Every individual must have a regular exercise and physical endurance tests. People who suffer from diabetes are recommended to be physically fit if possible. Exercises for the lungs and heart may help the person lessen the sugar that causes diabetes.

2. An individual must follow a diabetic diet program. Not being on the proper diet can be a great factor in acquiring type 2 diabetes. It is recommended that a person must lose weight if he is an overweight person. It is advisable that a person must be conscious of the food that he takes. Eat foods that do not have sugar content.

3. The option of the individual to have medication and seek the help of a doctor. Every diabetes patients that have type1 and type 2 diabetes can take insulin daily to sustain the insulin production of the pancreas. There is also the new insulin pump that continuously provides the much-needed insulin. There are also new medications that treat diabetes like the synthetic human insulin, Sulfonylurea drugs, Biguanides, Thiazolidinediones, Meglitinides, Alpha-glucosidase, and other drug combinations.

Diabetes can be prevented with the proper awareness and information regarding this illness. What is important is that a person must have a healthy diet and regular exercise to have a healthy body. Responsibility and discipline is needed to help oneself in overcoming this disease.

Diabetes Herbal Remedy Works Better Than Insulin?

It is another case of a home remedy waiting to be discovered. A new study suggests that a traditional Indian diabetes herb treatment lowers blood sugar and insulin levels as well as today’s prescription drugs.

39 healthy adults received extracts of the herb Salacia oblonga with promising results. Insulin and blood glucose levels were lowered by a maximum of 29 and 23 percent, respectively. These reductions occurred when test subjects received the largest dose of the herb extract (1,000 mg).

“These kinds of reductions are similar to what we might see with prescription oral medications for people with diabetes,” said Steve Hertzler, a study co-author and an assistant professor of nutrition at Ohio State University.

Salacia oblonga is an herb native to regions of India and Sri Lanka. Researchers found that it can bind to intestinal enzymes that convert carbohydrates into glucose. If the herb binds to these enzymes before the enzymes can turn carbs into glucose, then less glucose sugar enters the bloodstream. Therefore less insulin is required.

“Lowering blood glucose levels lowers the risk of disease-related complications in people with diabetes,” Hertzler said. “Also, poor compliance with diabetes medications often hinders the effectiveness of these drugs. It may be easier to get someone to take an herb with food or in a beverage, as opposed to a pill.”

Although this study was performed on healthy adults, the researchers also want to study the effects of the Salacia oblonga herb in diabetic patients.

Hertzler also commented that, “A lot of studies show that lowering blood sugar levels reduces the risk for all kinds of diabetes-related complications, such as kidney disease and nerve and eye damage. We want to see if this herb has this kind of effect.”

The herb caused an intestinal gas side effect. Researchers measured hydrogen and methane levels in the breath of study participants for a two-day period following each test. Additionally, participants rated the frequency and intensity of any nausea, cramps, or gas they experienced.

The studies will continue, but the herb is difficult to find in the U.S. Some online suppliers do exist.

This study was conducted by Ohio State University (OSU), and supported by the Ross Products Division of Abbott Laboratories in Columbus. It was reported in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, and on the OSU website at http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/saloblo.htm where the study researchers can be contacted and the full news release can be found.

A seemingly-obscure herb appears to have the same medicinal properties as some of today’s most-researched diabetes medicines. Just imagine what other home remedy treasures are waiting to be uncovered.

Interested in free home remedies? Learn more by visiting the site listed below.

Five Ways To Control Diabetes

If you have the tendency to inherit diabetes, you must read this and always be aware of the symptoms of the disease. There are many people, unfortunately, who do not know the signs or symptoms of diabetes.

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Those who suffer from this disease may have problems converting food to energy. In addition, the body will not get enough insulin and the amount of glucose in the blood increases.

In a few years, the high blood glucose may damage nerves and blood vessels leading to complications such as stroke, blindness, heart disease, kidney disease, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation.

Many people do not find out they have the disease until they suffer from complication, which of course will be too late to cure as the body will already be damaged.

The signs and symptoms can be so mild that some people might not even notice and suspect that they have diabetes. The most common symptoms include blurred vision, unhealed sores, increased thirst and hunger, fatigue, weight loss, and increased urination at night.

Finding out early if you have diabetes is important because treatment can prevent damage to the body. One of the preventions you can take, based on a report of a recent study, is by having the right amount of sleep.

Those who get too much or not enough sleep may increase diabetes risks. Dr. Henry Klar Yaggi from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, who lead the study, assumed those who sleep less than 6 hours per night, as well as those who sleep more than 8 hours, were at significantly increased risk for developing diabetes, compared to those who sleep 7 to 8 hours.

What else can you do to beat diabetes and live healthier without being worried about this disease? Here are things you can do to control your diabetes:

1. Weight Control – By controlling your weight, you will make your blood glucose levels normal. If you are overweight, it is difficult for your body to make and use insulin properly. Insulin is produced to help the body to use and store the blood glucose. Use the Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure of body weight relative to height, to see whether you are underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese.

2. Physically Active – You can walk, bike, take the stairs, dance, swim and do other outdoor activities that will keep cholesterol and blood pressure under control. Being extra active while staying indoor can also increase the number of calories you burn, such as walking around while you are talking on the phone, getting up to change the TV channel instead of using the remote control, working in the garden or cleaning up the house.

3. Aerobic – You might not know this activity can lower your blood glucose and improve your body’s ability to use insulin. Doing aerobic for 30 minutes a day, most days of the week, provides many benefits for your health. You can either take an aerobic class.

4. Following A Healthful Meal Plan – Having a meal plan can have big impact on your blood glucose. You can get sick if the blood glucose goes too high due to eating too much food containing lots of fat and calories. It is better to look at the serving sizes of the food you eat. Take more fruits and vegetables and lessen your salt intake.

5. Taking Diabetes Test – If you are potential to get diabetes, taking diabetes test is strongly recommended. The doctor will be able to explain about your condition after you have done a fasting blood glucose test or an oral glucose tolerance test.

So, the important thing is to control or prevent diabetes by balancing the blood glucose levels. If you can’t control them, the possibility of suffering diabetes will be higher.

Forget the cure for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer, or diabetes. Unless

If you want a cure for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer, or diabetes, don’t count on the academia, the National Institute of Health (NIH), or the biotech/pharmaceutical industry. With all the money they have spent on researching these diseases, they have very little to show for it.

In 1971, during the State of the Union address, President Nixon declared the war on cancer proposing “an intensive campaign to find a cure for cancer.” Since 1971, Americans spent, through taxes, donations, and private R&D, about $200 billion in inflation-adjusted dollars. This money produced 1.56 million papers on cancer. Yet, today we are no closer to a cure than we were in 1971. Why?

Consider what Dr. Almog said in his paper: Drug Industry in “depression” (Almog, D. Drug industry in “depression”. Med Sci Monit. 2005 Jan;11(1):SR1-4, I would urge you to read his paper, it’s an eye opener on relationship between academic research and commercial drug discovery): “When the basic science/biology of disease is not available, no new drugs come to market.” With the billion of dollars spent by the NIH on basic science, and the millions of papers published on the topic, the question is, “Why isn’t the basic science/biology of disease available? Individual discoveries in the biology of human disease are cornerstone in new treatments. However, in drug discovery, these basic science/biology discoveries are seemingly unrelated dots. To connect the dots you need a theory. The Blind Men and the Elephant is a famous story about six blind men encountering an elephant for the first time. Each man, seizing on the single feature of the animal, which he appeared to have touched first, and being incapable of seeing it whole, loudly maintained his limited opinion on the nature of the beast. The elephant was considered a wall, a spear, a snake, a tree, a fan or a rope, depending on whether the blind men had first grasped the creature’s side, tusk, trunk, knee, ear or tail. The story epitomizes the problem of the reductionist approach in biology. A recent book Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease, by Hanan Polansky [11], presents an alternative. The book identifies the disruption that causes atherosclerosis, cancer, obesity, osteoarthritis, type II diabetes, alopecia, type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, asthma, lupus, thyroiditis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, graft versus host disease, and other chronic diseases, and describes the sequence of events that leads from the disruption to the molecular, cellular, and clinical effects.

What are the implications of the NIH failure? A decline in the number of new drugs introduced by pharmaceutical companies. Consider what professor Taylor says in his paper: Fewer new drugs from the pharmaceutical industry (Taylor D. Fewer new drugs from the pharmaceutical industry. BMJ. 2003 Feb 22;326(7386):408-9): “In 2002 spending on medicines exceeded $400bn (£248bn; 377bn) worldwide. Optimists in the pharmaceutical industry believe that the global market for their products will go on expanding by around 10% a year, with the United States continuing to lead towards higher per capita outlays. Expenditure on research by the pharmaceutical industry is also increasing worldwide. It is now over $45bn a year—twice the sum recorded at the start of the 1990s—and projected to rise to $55bn by 2005-6. Concerns are growing, however, about the productivity of research being funded by the major pharmaceutical companies. … Empirical evidence indicates a crisis in productivity in pharmaceutical research. The number of medicines introduced worldwide that contain new active ingredients dropped from an average of over 60 a year in the late 1980s to 52 in 1991 and only 31 in 2001. The overall number of new active substances undergoing regulatory review is still falling.”

On the one hand, the expenditure on research is increasing. On the other, the number of new drugs is decreasing. The professionals call this situation the productivity crisis in drug discovery.

The NIH failed to produce the so much needed biology of chronic disease because it is caught in the reductionist mentality. Dr. Hanan Polansky offers an alternative. If we want a cure for cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer, or diabetes, we need to seriously consider his alternative.

Getting To Know Your Insulin Pump

Some health care providers prefer the insulin pump because its slow release of insulin mimics how a normally working pancreas would release insulin. Studies vary on whether the pump provides better blood glucose control than multiple daily injections. Another advantage of the insulin pump is that it frees you from having to measure insulin into a syringe.

An insulin pump is a medical device continuously delivering insulin under the skin through a catheter. It’s usually connects somewhere in the waist area. There’s a new generation of insulin pumps, called a patch pump. Currently patch pumps are only available from OmniPod. Patch pumps adhere directly to the skin with no catheter tubing showing. It then infuses insulin directly under the skin.

Either pump delivers insulin at an hourly rate. For instance, the rate might be 1.1 units an hour. However, the pump delivers different rates at different times of day depending on the patient’s insulin infusion (or basal) rates that are programmed into the pump.

The amount of insulin delivered depends on two things. First by the amount of carbohydrate a patient eats using an insulin to carbohydrate ratio, and then by the correction factor, or the ratio of the number of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) a patient’s blood sugar will be lowered by one insulin unit.
If a patient eats 60 grams carbohydrate at meals and has an insulin-carbohydrate ratio of one insulin unit to 15 grams carbohydrate, the patient’s insulin injection at that meal would 4 units.

However, if a patient has a correction factor of one unit to 50 points of blood sugar, the pump should give an additional injection of 2.5 units to lower his blood sugar from 245 mg/dl to a needed level of 120 mg/dl.

To use an insulin pump a patient must be able to manage it. This involves knowledge at several levels. First, patients must understand how to insert the catheter when using the pump, or how to attach the newer patch pump to their abdomen. They must also be able to push the right buttons on the pump to deliver proper insulin doses and adjust the basal rates.

Then the patient needs to be skilled in carbohydrate counting so they are able to deliver correct insulin doses at mealtimes. And they should be willing to check their blood glucose levels at least four to six times a day. This assures that they detect a pump failure and prevent hyperglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, in type 1 patients).

Patient attention is important because no long-acting insulin is used in type 1 patients who use pumps and they need to correct high- or low-blood sugars before they are clinically observable and symptomatic.

Insulin pump therapy is almost never needed to maintain life because insulin can be easily injected under the skin. Most insurers will cover insulin pump therapy in situations where insulin pump therapy will significantly improve the level of diabetes care and control over and above multidose insulin (MDI) therapy. This includes cases where:

The glucose control in multidose insulin therapy is not optimal with glycated hemoglobin (Hba1c>) than the ADA (American Diabetes Association) recommended goal of 7%. An endocrinologist, who will be able to help the patient learn how to use and the pump and adjust basal and correction doses, prescribes the pump.

The patient has type 1 diabetes. However, in many situations patients with type 2 diabetes will benefit from the pump as well. Presence of hypoglycemia despite adjustments in insulin doses and utilizing carbohydrate counting to help decide pre-meal insulin doses in patients who are using MDI therapy.

Presence of hyperglycemia-especially as revealed by high morning readings (Dawn phenomenon) where increasing basal rates of insulin in the early morning hours would help to better control blood sugar levels.

Insurers require medical charts from the prescribing doctor as well as blood sugar logs from the patient to prove that there is real medical necessity.

How Did I End Up With Diabetes?

How do you get Diabetes?

There are two main types of diabetes mellitus. These are known as type 1 and type 2.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus used to be called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, because it usually begins in childhood or adolescence.

In type 1 diabetes mellitus, the pancreas releases no insulin at all because the body has destroyed the cells that produce it (islet cells). The patient therefore relies on treatment with insulin.

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common form of diabetes. It used to be called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, or adult onset diabetes because it usually begins in adulthood.

In type 2 diabetes, patients can still produce insulin, but they do not produce enough and/or their bodies cannot use it properly.

Treating high blood pressure and controlling the levels of fats (lipids) in the blood are also very important in patients with diabetes as they are at greater risk than the normal population of developing serious cardiovascular diseases.

A group of medicines known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors are sometimes used to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular complications in diabetes and can also reduce the risk or progression of kidney and eye diseases.

What causes diabetes?

While scientists aren’t exactly sure why Type 1 diabetes happens, they do know the immune system is involved. A healthy immune system protects us from diseases caused by infections, such as colds or the flu, as well as diseases that start in our own cells, such as cancer. For some reason, in certain people, the immune system becomes confused and begins attacking and destroying the cells in the pancreas that make insulin.4 Scientists aren’t exactly sure why Type 2 diabetes happens either; however, they have identified that it occurs most often in certain individuals. About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, have high blood pressure, and have high cholesterol levels in their blood

Could the diabetic formula lower my blood sugar level too much?
In general, too low blood sugar levels should not be a problem. A high quality diabetic formula containing synergistic vitamins, minerals, and herbs, most often lowers blood sugars to normal levels. However, these vitamins, minerals, and herbs will not excessively lower blood sugar levels that are already normal.

Natural Ways To Treat Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease caused when the body does not properly produce insulin. Seven percent of the population in the United States has diabetes. There are two types of the disease. Type one diabetes is where the body does not produce insulin and type two is where the body resists insulin. The majority of people diagnosed with this disease have type two. Symptoms of diabetes include extreme thirst, hazy vision, excessive hunger, weight fluctuation, fatigue and frequent urination. Diabetes is often controlled with insulin and prescription drugs, but diet and exercise play a large part in the ability to control the disease. There are also herbs that can help reduce the effects of diabetes.

Ensure a healthy diet by concentrating on foods such as vegetables, grains, fiber and legumes. These foods will help regulate sugar in the blood stream. Avoid junk food and foods that contain sugar such as cakes, cookies and other sweets. Alcohol, tobacco and caffeine should also be avoided to maintain a nourishing diet.

Exercise helps promote good health and combats against the negative effects of diabetes. It is important to exercise regularly and keep an appropriate weight. People who are inactive or overweight have a higher risk factor for diabetes and are prone to suffer from more side effects caused by the disease. It is especially important to exercise to build muscle. Starting a weight program will increase muscle mass which will increase sensitivity to insulin.

There are many herbal remedies recognized for their therapeutic properties of treating diabetes. They are commonly found in pharmacies and grocery stores and can be a great natural remedy. Prickly pear cactus has shown positive results in the treatment of this disease and was recently recognized by the International Diabetes Center as a viable natural remedy. Bitter Melon has been used for years in Asia, Africa and South America for treatment. Garlic will reduce sugar levels and is a healthy way to add flavor to food while benefiting from its curative traits. Other common herbs are ginseng, psyllium, fenugreek, bilberry, dandelion and burdock.

Vitamin supplements are frequently used to help treat diabetes with the most commonly recommended ones being vitamins B6, C and E. Also, zinc, selenium, alpha lipoic acid, chromium and vanadium are commonly used. Rather than take individual supplements, some patients opt for a multivitamin to add to their diet.

Diabetes is a disease that affects a large portion of the population. The risks associated with it are serious but can be controlled with lifestyle change. Ensuring a well balanced diet and good exercise routine will help in preventing side effects. Also, proper use of herbs, vitamins and natural remedies will help prevent the necessity for more traditional means of medication.

Venomous Lizard Puts The Bite On Diabetes

Here is yet another case of a home remedy waiting to be discovered. In 2005 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a drug for the treatment of Type II Diabetes. The drug is called Byetta (exenatide). There’s nothing amazing about that part. New drugs are created often.

The almost unbelievable part is where the drug originated. It wasn’t produced in a lab. Instead, the active ingredient of Byetta comes from the venomous saliva of the Gila Monster lizard.

The Gila Monster, once thought to be one of only two venomous lizards, lives in the deserts of the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. The Gila Monster is a thick-bodied, heavy and slow-moving lizard. It grows to a maximum length of 2 feet (0.6 m) and preys on small rodents, fledgling birds, and eggs. It tends to eat animals on the ground that cannot move fast (or at all). The quick, strong bite of the Gila Monster delivers venomous saliva that is normally not fatal to humans.

Instead, there is a component of the lizard’s venom that is extremely helpful to certain humans. A component in the Gila Monster’s venom has proven remarkably effective in the control of Type II Diabetes in humans. The Gila Monster is a protected species in the U.S. Fortunately, the exenatide drug can now be synthesized in the lab instead of from live animals.

Diabetes is a chronic medical disorder generally characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels, especially after eating. The diabetic patient must consistently monitor blood sugar levels to keep them within a safe range.

When high blood sugar occurs, insulin is used to bring it down to a safer level. If low blood sugar occurs, the patient generally consumes carbohydrates to raise the glucose level to a safe level. Type II Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by resistance to insulin, a deficiency in insulin, and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar or excess glucose).

Exenatide helps with glucose (blood sugar) management in several ways:

1. It signals the pancreas to create additional insulin when glucose levels are too high;

2. It regulates the liver so that it doesn’t produce unneeded glucose; and

3. It helps slow the rate at which sugar enters the bloodstream.

Studies showed that another significant effect of exenatide use was weight loss. Overweight diabetes patients can have more difficulty controlling blood sugar levels. The effectiveness of exenatide for diabetic blood glucose control stems from its ability to activate several glucose control pathways simultaneously.

Byetta (exenatide) is a wonderful drug, although its discovery sounds like some kind of horror story. One can only imagine gruesome (but fictitious) clinical trials where unsuspecting diabetics are asked to stick their arms into dark boxes containing Gila Monsters. This discovery sounds like one of those “good news/bad news” jokes. For example, the doctor says, “The bad news is that the lizard probably won’t release its bite on your leg for another week. The good news is that your diabetes has improved!”