A Brief History Of Hip Replacement Surgery

Hip replacement is a medical procedure in which the hip joint is replaced by a synthetic implant. It is the most successful, cheapest and safest form of joint replacement surgery. The earliest recorded attempts at hip replacement, which were carried out in Germany, used ivory to replace the femoral head.
Use of artificial hips became more widespread in the 1930s; the artificial joints were made of steel or chrome. They were considered to be better than arthritis but had a number of drawbacks. The main problem was that the articulating surfaces could not be lubricated by the body, leading to wear and loosening and hence the need to replace the joint again (known as revision operations).

Attempts to use teflon produced joints that caused osteolysis and wore out within two years. Another significant problem was infection. Before the advent of antibiotics, surgery on the joints carried a high risk of infection. Even with antibiotic treatments, infection is still a cause for some revision operations. Such infections are not necessarily caused at surgery; they can also be the result of bacteria entering the bloodstream during dental treatment.

The modern artificial joint owes much to the work of John Charnley at the Manchester Royal Infirmary; his work in the field of tribology resulted in a design that completely replaced the other designs by the 1970s. Charnley’s design consisted of 3 parts – (1) a metal (originally Stainless Steel) femoral component, (2) an Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular component, both of which were fixed to the bone using (3) special bone cement. The replacement joint, which was known as the Low Friction Arthroplasty, was lubricated with synovial fluid.

The small femoral head (22.25mm) produced wear issues which made it suitable only for sedentary patients, but – on the plus side – a huge reduction in resulting friction led to excellent clinical results. For over two decades, the Charnley Low Friction Arthroplasty design was the most used system in the world, far surpassing the other available options (like McKee and Ring).

In 1960 a Burmese orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. San Baw (29 June 1922 – 7 December 1984), pioneered the use of ivory hip prostheses to replace ununited fractures of the neck of femur (‘hip bones’), when he first used an ivory prosthesis to replace the fractured hip bone of an 83 year old Burmese Buddhist nun, Daw Punya. This was done while Dr San Baw was the chief of orthopeadic surgery at Mandalay General Hospital in Manadalay, Burma. Dr San Baw used over 300 ivory hip replacements from the 1960s to 1980s.

He presented a paper entitled ‘Ivory hip replacements for ununited fractures of the neck of femur’ at the conference of the British Orthopeadic Association held in London in September 1969. An 88% success rate was discerned in that Dr San Baw’s patients ranging from the ages of 24 to 87 were able to walk, squat, ride the bicycle and play football a few weeks after their fractured hip bones were replaced with ivory prostheses. Dr San Baw’s use of ivory was, at least in Burma during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (before the illicit ivory trade became rampant starting around the early 1990s) cheaper than metal. Moreover, due to the physical, mechanical, chemical, and biological qualities of ivory, it was found that there was a better ‘biological bonding’ of ivory with the human tissues nearby the ivory prostheses. An extract from Dr San Baw’s paper, which he presented at the British Orthopeadic Association’s Conference in 1969, is published in Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), February 1970.

In the last decade, several evolutionary improvements have been made in the total hip replacement procedure and prosthesis. Many hip implants are made of a ceramic material rather than polyethylene, which some research indicates dramatically reduces joint wear. Metal-on-metal implants are also gaining popularity. Some implants are joined without cement; the prosthesis is given a porous texture into which bone grows. This has been shown to reduce the need for revision of the acetabular component. Surgeons still frequently use bone cement for the femoral component, however, which has proven very successful after 35 years of clinical experience.

The latest developments are several competing Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) approaches, which may result in far less soft tissue damage and a quicker recovery. C.A.O.S (Computer assisted orthopedic surgery) is also being marketed heavily by the implant manufacturers, though its value remains largely unproven.. Computer assisted surgery is said to better navigate prosthetic implantation.

An alternative to total hip replacement (THR) is hip surface replacement (HSR), also referred to as hip resurfacing. With both THR and HSR, a prosthetic socket is pressed into the pelvis. With THR, the end of the femur is amputated, a metal shank is inserted into the femur, and the shank holds a ball which mates with the socket. With resurfacing, the end of the femur is not amputated; the outer surface of the femoral ball is replaced with a cylindrical metal cap. Resurfacing eliminates the common THR problem of the metal shaft loosening from the femur. Resurfacing preserves bone stock if a revision is ever needed. A larger diameter ball and socket more closely mimic the natural joint structure, reducing the risk of dislocation and improving range of motion. There has been no published clinical evidence to show that today’s CoCr metal-on-metal articulating surfaces have the osteolytic effect on bone that earlier polyethylene devices had. Ten year success rates of hip resurfacing from studies in England report success equal to or greater than standard total hip replacement, in age-matched patients. In the United States, the first modern resurfacing device received FDA approval in May 2006, while some 90,000 resurfacings have been performed world-wide.

Patients need to be aware of all surgical options before hip replacement surgery. Hip surgeons have different surgical techniques and surgical outcomes. Currently, there are several different incisions used to access your hip joint. The posterior approach (widely used by the majority of orthopedic surgeons) separates the gluteus maximus muscle in line with the muscle fibers to access the hip joint. Other methods access the hip from the lateral side of the hip joint. In contrast to the posterior approach and lateral approach, the anterior approach uses a natural interval between soft tissue to gain access to the hip joint. Its main disadvantages are that it risks damage to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and it is not widely available to the public because fewer surgeons have been trained in this technique.

Breast Enlargement – Converting Small to Big

Breast enlargement is the procedure that can change the lifestyle of a woman that seeks desperately to enhance her personality. As well as it can fulfill the need of getting an alluring look for the woman. Breast enlargement can be done in several ways. But the fact is that you ought to choose the most affordable and safe way for your purpose. On one side breast enlargement can offer a woman something, which she needs to feel more confident and sexy. But the other face of breast enlargement still present that can spoil the whole attempt in an instance.

As already mentioned there are several ways to perform the task and needs to be done under perfect supervision of physician. There is huge variety of breast enlargement products coming to the market on a regular basis. You need to know all about the product before going to use it. For that reason you need to consult the Doctor first. Otherwise you may face a negative impact on your body. So be careful about the fact.

Plastic surgery for breast or otherwise popular breast transplantation is now growing n demand. Previously it was costly and only the celebrities and high paid models are going for it. But with the incorporation of high-end technology, now someone really interested in it can do it. Some of the certified Doctors are involved in the business and can accomplish the task for you in an affordable manner.

In the market you can avail massage oils and lotions for breast enlargement. A perfect massage oil or lotion can improve the blood flow to your breast vessels thus resulting in a well-shaped breast. The key objective behind all the massage oil or lotion is to offer you the alluring look you desired since a long period. Ladies with the small breasts are now moving for the procedure so that they can too demand their position in the mass and can drag more attention. Now it’s your turn! Just make sure of one thing before using any product that it is safe and effective for your small breasts.

Colon Surgery – What Are Your Options?

How many people do you know who remain cool and unaffected at the prospect of undergoing surgery? Not many I assume. A chlorophorm smelling operation theatre, the surgeon and his assistants with their mouth covered and carrying scalpels that are glistening under the bright light of operation theatre— a common imagery we come across in every second Hollywood film. And a shudder runs through our spine on thinking about surgery. This often makes us develop an escapist attitude and we chose to ignore the symptoms which could have otherwise got completely cured if interfered with simple surgery.

It is particularly true of colon related problems, where little surgical intervention can make for dramatic improvement, but people just shy away from the problem in their apathy for undergoing surgery. But suppose you get a chance to repair your colonic problems by surgical procedure minus the inconveniences associated with a conventional surgery, what you will do? Yes, of course you will opt for the surgery and you are not alone in your choice. Increasing number of Americans are undergoing laparoscopic colon surgery every year to get rid of the colon related diseases like diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s colitis and hemorrhage. In most of these cases parts of colon are removed and two ends are stitched up and in case of colorectal cancer, the cancerous parts and surrounding tissue and lymph glands are removed to reduce the chance of recurrence.

The minimally invasive colon surgery popularly known as laparoscopic surgery has been increasingly viewed as an alternative to traditional or open colon surgery. The conventional colon surgery can not promise a fast and easy recovery as they are highly invasive. Incision is made over a large area of the abdomen and you have to stay at hospital for 5-8 days and recovery period spans to an average of 6 weeks.

On the other hand, the laparoscopic colon surgery ensures you not only quicker recovery and shorter hospital stay, it also ensures your colon’s getting back to its normal bowel function quicker. Then in this surgery, you feel less pain and the scar is also much smaller. You can resume the solid-food diet in laparoscopic colon surgery and also can return to your normal routine.

Laparoscopic colon surgery is a comparatively new technique in which a laparoscope or tiny telescope with a video camera connection is inserted into one of the openings. Through the video camera the surgeon gets to see the inside of your abdomen and he inserts his surgical instruments through another small incision to remove the damaged portion of the colon. Then in the same way, the healthier portions are stitched up.

So if you are among those who want a healthier colon to enjoy life in its fullest, but get nervous at the very thought of a traditional surgery, then Laparoscopic colon surgery is the ideal solution for you; it repairs your colon but causing you minimum discomfort.

Emergency Inguinal Hernia Surgery vs. Elective Inguinal Hernia Surgery

Inguinal hernia is a very common disorder, affecting millions of people in the United States alone. Considered to be a surgical disease, inguinal hernia accounts for thousands of annual operations worldwide.

Although inguinal hernia can occur in both sexes, the disorder predominantly affects men. Also, this type of hernia has the highest incidence in the elderly, people who frequently sustain physical effort and smokers. Inguinal hernia usually occurs on the background of a weak lower abdominal wall, allowing the internal soft tissues to pierce through it. The symptoms of inguinal hernia are: abdominal pain and discomfort (which intensify with intense physical effort or sudden moves), abdominal bloating and nausea. Some people with inguinal hernia are asymptomatic, rendering the process of diagnosing the disorder a lot more difficult.

There are many factors that can lead to the development of inguinal hernia, such as birth defects, internal disorders or acquired weaknesses of the abdominal wall. In the recent past, the majority of patients who were diagnosed with inguinal hernia were suggested to have their disorder surgically corrected as soon as possible. However, nowadays there are many debates over the necessity of surgical intervention when dealing with patients diagnosed with inguinal hernia. Although the surgery for inguinal hernia is a simple procedure, most patients experience a post-operative recurrence of the disorder. Hence, in many cases the surgical treatment for inguinal hernia only provides temporary relief, and most patients who suffer surgical hernia repair are later hospitalized due to complications.

Physicians have begun to doubt the efficiency of most surgical treatments for inguinal hernia and nowadays they only recommend surgical interventions to patients with complicated forms of the disorder. The majority of patients diagnosed with uncomplicated inguinal hernia nowadays have the possibility to decide whether they will have their hernia surgically repaired or not and in many cases, the best option for patients is to delay surgery until it is absolutely required. Statistics reveal that the patients who have their inguinal hernia surgically corrected can in time experience a relapse of the disorder and they are actually more exposed to developing complications than the patients who delay their surgery.

In many cases, the factors that lead to the recurrence of inguinal hernia in patients who suffer surgery are related to native predispositions. It seems that most patients who experience a post-operative recurrence of their inguinal hernia have a weak abdominal wall or other internal physiological abnormalities. The categories exposed to the highest risk of relapse are: people with native defects of the internal organs (gastrointestinal problems), people with physiological abnormalities of the abdominal wall and people whose careers involve intense physical activities. Patients who belong to these categories are advised to delay their inguinal hernia surgery for as long as possible, in order to prevent a recurrence or even an aggravation of the disorder.

Frequently Asked Questions FAQ About LASIK Laser Eye Surgery

LASIK is a well-renowned refractive surgery procedure, and hence often takes center stage in a lot many discussions pertinent to refractive surgery. A technology so advanced as that wielded by LASIK often boggles the mind. Patients planning to undergo LASIK surgery will have several questions requiring elaborate answers. It is imperative that all lurking doubts be elucidated on prior to going in for surgery. Following is a brief list of frequently asked questions about LASIK.

How do I know if I am a viable candidate for LASIK? – The best way to determine your candidature is to have a comprehensive preoperative examination, which discovers any condition that might preclude LASIK. In general, you must be above 18, having healthy eyes with low to moderate refractive error (for best results), and should not be suffering from any eye ailments. Moreover, pregnant or nursing women are advised to postpone LASIK surgery until after there prescription stabilizes.

How long does the procedure last? – LASIK is a fairly expedited procedure. The whole process is over within half an hour or less.

Does LASIK hurt? – LASIK involves virtually no pain. The surgeon typically administers anesthetic eye drops and a mild sedative prior to the surgery.

Can I drive back home after the surgery? – No. It is advised that you arrange for someone to drive you back home, since your vision would be blurry immediately after the surgery.

Are the effects of LASIK eye surgery permanent? – Yes. LASIK is an irreversible procedure. It might take around 3 to 6 months for the complications, if any, to subside and the vision to stabilize. Following this period, the physical effects of the treatment are permanent. However, age related vision problems might alter the visual acuity.

Will I require eyeglasses after LASIK surgery? – In general, LASIK eliminates a person’s dependence on eyeglasses or contact lenses. Though a rarity, a few people might need a minimal prescription for certain activities. Anyway, reading glasses are typically necessary beyond the age of 40, when presbyopia sets in. This is when the eye lens loses its accommodation power.

What is the frequency of follow up visits after surgery? – The surgeon would normally examine you on the day following surgery. After that, there should be regular checkups spanning a period of around 3 to 6 months – a time period enough for the visual results to completely set in. Basically, the recovery should be meticulously monitored over a substantial period of time.

If you find a LASIK doctor that you are confident with, you will be able to get more information about LASIK laser eye surgery.

Gastric Bypass Surgery – Recovery And Expectations

Gastric bypass surgery is the latest medical technique in the field of controlling obesity and obesity related diseases. Weight loss procedures are either restrictive which reduce the size of your stomach or malabsorptive which lessen the flow of food from stomach to the intestine thus reducing the absorption of fat and other essential vitamins and minerals. These techniques are used in combination in gastric bypass surgery which creates a small pouch in your stomach making a larger area of your stomach not participate in retaining the food. Also, a bypass is created in the small intestine which allows partial absorption of food leading to weight reduction.

Laparoscopic procedures are used to create small incisions through which instruments and a camera is inserted into the body which enables the surgeon to perform the surgery which is done under general anesthesia.

The more pertinent question is of the recovery after the operation. The good news is though it is an operation taking several hours and a lot of precision, the recovery is relatively fast. The patient is discharged from the hospital within two to seven days depending upon individual condition. Doctors generally allow discharge once you are able to eat liquid or pureed food without vomiting, walk without major discomfort and are not taking injections for pain. This implies that the main discomforting symptoms are over by the first week. The vomiting results because the patient is not in-sync with the amount of food his newly created smaller stomach would be able to take and also because the new system created within the body takes a little time to assume smooth activity.

The overall recovery however takes several weeks and it’s suggested to strictly follow the guidelines and resume normal activity gradually. Doctors send patients home encouraging them to do small chores around the house. Stairs and normal bath routine is resumed only after a few days. You may need pain killers at home as well. It’s important to keep a track of fever, pain which should not escalate and proper healing of the wounds. There small incisions should not feel warm or look red and swollen and there should not be any fluids leaking from the cuts. Any such symptoms should be immediately reported.

Another serious condition during first two months of recovery can be “dumping syndrome” the indications of which are nausea, vomiting, sweating and fatigue. These conditions however would not appear if the diet guidelines are being followed carefully. Most importantly, you would have to be prepared for frequent doctor visits at least in the first whole year to keep a check on your diet, lifestyle, proper healing of the incisions, general recovery and progress and if there are any further surgical requirements.

With the recovery, it’s important to know the risks as well. There may be infections, nutrient deficiencies like B12 and iron leading to anemia, calcium deficiencies creating possibilities for early osteoporosis and inflammation of stomach lining called gastritis. The more serious issues can be hernia, blood clots in lungs, gallstones due to immediate loss of a lot of weight and ulcers. These are generally well explained before an individual agrees for gastric bypass procedures. Also, they are not frequently reported and there are various success stories that favor the procedure. It needs to be realized that risks run with almost all surgeries in medicine. Gastric bypass is meant for people generally crossing the BMI of 40 or a BMI of 35 with diseases like type 2 diabetes or heart diseases which have been controlled with weight loss in many cases.

So, what should be the general expectations of a person considering Gastric Bypass Surgery? The expectations should be good overall. On health front, you lose about sixty to eighty percent of excess weight with this operation. A person after this operation loses ten pounds a month on an average, the loss being higher in the initial months when liquid diets are part of the health maintenance and recovery regime. Your body reaches a stable weight within eighteen to twenty four months. Another good news is diseases like sleeping apnea, heart diseases, diabetes, pains in the lower back, knees and other joints reduces significantly and may even disappear with the weight loss. The good news however comes with various changes in lifestyle and food habits.

Thus, on nutritional front, utmost care needs to be taken to prevent any deficiencies and maintain the weight loss. The diet guidelines in this care are strict and should be necessarily adhered to. Post-operation you need to gradually shift from liquid to pureed and then small quantities of soft and further normal solid food. This is because your stomach is initially very small and expands with time thus increasing its capability to take in solids and larger amounts of food. Protein should be your major calorie provider accounting for about 70-75% of the total 800 calories that you should be consuming approximately. Carbohydrates should amount to 10-15% and fats about 5-15% in your diet. Sugar intake should be avoided or reduced especially in the initial months as it can cause dumping syndrome explained earlier. This is because a smaller stomach and reduces absorption makes it difficult to digest sugar thus causing convulsions and other symptoms. Vitamin B12, calcium, iron and other nutritional supplements would become a part of your life depending upon the doctor’s evaluation of your personal needs.

On physical front, you would look good with the weight loss but there may be issues of skin sagging due to sudden weight loss. At relatively younger ages, skin can recover and get back to adjust with the new weight but at later ages further surgery for correction may have to be considered. These include face lifts, tummy tuck, breast reduction, eye lid corrections, neck lifts and more.

On general well being after the operation, you should expect and be prepared for lifestyle changes which would require incorporating regular exercise and food constraints which would mean eating cautiously the amounts that your stomach can accommodate giving you the best nutrition and energy with it. Also, regular check ups for mental and physical health are suggested to make sure you get optimum benefits from the surgery.

Overall, it can prove to be a blessing for an excessively overweight person who would benefit from weight loss, reduced chances of diseases associated with weight gain and a surge in confidence.

Gastric Bypass Surgery – Types And Risks

Gastric bypass surgery is a common form of weight loss surgery that results in outstanding weight loss with minimal side effects. But once you undergo the gastric bypass surgery procedure you have to accept lifelong changes in your diet. The post-diet of gastric bypass surgery includes an adequate intake of protein, taking vitamin and mineral supplements including multivitamin, iron and calcium, B12 and avoiding sweets and fatty foods.

Types of gastric bypass surgery

In gastric bypass surgery, the surgeon takes off a large portion of the stomach leaving behind a tiny pouch. It is this small pouch that prevents overdose of eating as it can take very less amount of food. Moreover, with large parts of your stomach and small intestine bypassed, most of the nutrients and calories in the food do not get absorbed at all. This helps the person from gaining excess weight.

There are several types of bypass surgery operations.
They are:

§Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RGB] – this is a common surgery where a small stomach pouch is created by stapling part of the stomach together or by vertical banding. This reduces the amount of food to be taken. Then a Y-shaped section of the small intestine is attached to the pouch to allow food to bypass the duodenum as well as the first portion of jejunum. This causes reduced calorie and rapid nutrient absorption.

§Extensive gastric bypass [biliopancreatic diversion] – in this complicated surgery, the lower portion of the stomach is removed. The small pouch that remains connected to the final segment of the small intestine completely bypasses both duodenum and jejunum.

People who undergo gastric bypass surgery always lose two-thirds of their excess weight within two years.

Risks of gastric bypass surgery

Gastric bypass surgery causes “dumping syndromes” where the stomach contents move too rapidly through the small intestine. The usual symptoms of gastric bypass surgeries include weakness, sweating, fainting, nausea, diarrhea, as well as inability to eat sweets.

People who undergo this procedure are at risk of:

§Band erosion – the band closing off part of the stomach disintegrates

§Pouch stretching – stomach gets bigger overtime, stretching back to its normal size before surgery

§Leakage of stomach contents into the abdomen [acid can eat away other organs]

§Nutritional deficiencies causing health problems

§Breakdown of staple lines – band and staple fall apart, reversing procedure

Gastric bypass diet

Gastric bypass diet helps the patients to drop 50% to 90% of their overall excess fats. The diet is designed to bring about significant weight loss. It basically includes foods that are high in protein and low in fat, fiber, calories, and sugar. You should have lots of vitamins and minerals. Iron, vitamin, folate and calcium are the best nutrients for patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery.

You can undergo gastric bypass surgery only if you have been obese for at least 5 years, do not have a history of alcohol abuse, and do not possess untreated depression and range between the ages 18 to 65.

Gastric Surgery – Miracle Cure For Obesity?

You wake up one morning and you decided that you have had enough of being obese! You have a very personal reason: a choice for change and a healthier you.

Whether you’re considering weight-loss surgery and want to understand what’s ahead, adapting to a new lifestyle following the procedure, or looking for non-surgical weight-loss tips, all the information is here.

Opting for weight-loss surgery is not an easy choice. To decide whether it’s right for you, consider the facts of the procedure and the post-operative road you’ll need to travel.

The challenges of dieting, exercise and even medications can seem daunting when trying to keep weight off. As a result, many have turned to weight-loss surgery as the best long-term option. But before making that difficult decision, questions need to be answered.

Which type of weight-loss surgery is right for you?
What’s involved in the procedure?
Are there any risks associated with weight-loss surgery?
In normal digestion, food passes through the stomach and enters the small intestine, where most of the nutrients and calories are absorbed. It then passes into the large intestine (colon), and the remaining waste is eventually excreted.

Gastric bypass surgery makes the stomach smaller and allows food to bypass part of the small intestine. You will feel full more quickly than when your stomach was its original size, which reduces the amount of food you eat and thus the calories consumed. Bypassing part of the intestine also results in fewer calories being absorbed. This leads to weight loss.

The most common gastric bypass surgery is a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

In a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the stomach is made smaller by creating a small pouch at the top of the stomach using surgical staples or a plastic band. The smaller stomach is connected directly to the middle portion of the small intestine (jejunum), bypassing the rest of the stomach and the upper portion of the small intestine (duodenum).

This procedure can be done by making a large incision in the abdomen (an open procedure) or by making a small incision and using small instruments and a camera to guide the surgery (laparoscopic approach).

Male gender is a predictor of morbidity and age a predictor of mortality for patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery. Open gastric bypass surgery requires up to a 5-day stay. Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery requires a hospital stay of 2-3 days.

Hip Replacement Surgery Has Come A Very Long Way

Do you ever feel like you know just enough about Hip Replacements to be knowledgeable? Let’s see if we can fill in some of the gaps with the latest info on Hip Replacement Surgery.

Not to long ago my mother had a hip replacement surgery done at the hospital in our home town. As you can imagine it was a very difficult time for her and the family.

The cost of a hip replacement surgery is not just a money thing, although there are some financial costs involved. The real cost, however, is the time she lost in a slow and painful recovery from the surgery.

Once you begin to move beyond basic background information, you begin to realize that there’s more to Hip Replacements than you may have first thought. My mother had her hip replaced because she was suffering from a very rare condition.

The whole family knew she had pain in her hips for months before we even knew that she would need a hip replacement. After lots of research the doctor eventually found what was bugging my mother.

She had avascular necrosis, a rare and strange disease for which she had none of the risk factors the doctor told her. Avascular necrosis is a condition which strikes divers, alcoholics and the elderly or some times even athletes. My mother didn’t fit in any of these categories and still got the same disease.

The condition occurs when a certain area of the bone isn’t getting enough blood supply, because the bone doesn’t get the nutrition it needs it begins to weaken and eventually dies on its own. Due to the fact that this process happens inside of the bone structure, it can take a long while before it surfaces and you start feeling physical discomfort.

For my mom, the necrosis did enough damage to make her need a hip replacement. Her hip was simply to weak and rotted from the inside. Thankfully, research in the Hip replacement field has come a long way. Even so, it took months before she got most of her movement back. My mother needed to endure many difficult and intensely painful sessions with a physical therapist to improve her agility.

At this point in time she has gained most of her movement back. The doctors say that her hip replacement surgery was a success, but even with her new hip she will be less mobile for the rest of her life.

She now experiences that she isn’t as active as she used to be because of the hip replacement surgery she has had in the past. She often gets tired if she walks to long.

She also shares a common complaint with other people who have done the same surgery. Her hip often tends to act up when the weather changes. Although many would think this is not a big issue it can be very painful at nights when you try to get some sleep.

So now you know a little bit about Hip Replacement.

How Does Knee Surgery Work?

The most common reasons for knee surgery are arthritis and injury. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that slowly wears away cartilage. Rheumatoid arthritis is inflammation of the knee, causing damage to the cartilage. Arthritis can develop in people of all ages but is more commonly found in the older segment of the population. Injury can occur following a blow to the knee and is commonly a result of sports related injuries. This type of injury is often found in younger people who are involved in activities with a lot of stress to the knee, sudden shifting of positions, or potential for the knee to be hit. There are several types of surgery to repair damage done to the knee.

Synovectomy is the process where the lining of the knee is replaced. This surgery often helps reduce progression of knee problems and can delay the need for more invasive surgery. This type of surgery shows success only if the problems were diagnosed early and the damage is not severe. Prolonged diagnosis or advanced injury will not likely be conducive to this type of surgery.

An osteotomy is a procedure is where the bones are cut and realigned to redistribute weight. If this type of surgery is performed, it may reduce the necessity for a knee replacement. In order for it to be successful, though; early detection is crucial. Even in more advanced cases, this surgery can prolong the need for knee replacement by up to ten years.

Menisectomy is where pieces of cartilage are removed to help promote a pain free experience. This procedure is an arthroscopic process resulting in less recovery time and lowered post operative pain. In approximately sixty percent of patients, this procedure can provide maximum relief for up to five years. It has a high success rate.

Total knee replacement surgery is the most radical type of surgery of the knee. It is usually a last resort and will occur only with progressive advancement of damage or in cases of severe distress. This procedure is still in its early stages of development but advances are made continually. This type of surgery is proven to be highly effective and can provide permanent relief from pain and stiffness.

Damage to the knee can cause pain and stiffness. This may hamper a person’s ability to walk or perform routine exercises comfortably. Surgery is a viable option for reducing the effects of knee arthritis or injury. Most physicians recommend utilizing the least invasive form of surgery possible. This will provide relief and delay the necessity for more radical surgery.